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Disney Stops Bending Rules for Guests

Since the Disney Resorts and Disney Parks across the globe have been inundated lately with badly-behaving Guests — whether they have been Guests who punch other people or TikTokers who break rules just to get more followers — Disney has been cracking down on Guests more and more in recent months, presumably due to said bad behavior.

However, Guests are also apparently fond of flouting rules that are put in place by Disney when it comes to Annual Passes and Disneyland Magic Keys — and now Disney is setting some hard limits in the Disney World Annual Passholder and Disneyland Magic Key Pass departments, too!

Disneyland Magic Key Pass

Disneyland Magic Key Passes include the Enchant Key, Believe Key, Imagine Key, and Dream Key. These Magic Key Passes are for Disneyland in Southern California, not Walt Disney World Resort in Florida. Credit: Disney

The Disneyland Magic Key Passes in the Magic Key program include the Enchant Key, Believe Key, Imagine Key, and Dream Key — and as with any Annual Pass or Disney membership purchase, there are restrictions that apply.

One such Disneyland Magic Key Pass restriction involves children who are older than three years old: in the past, Disney Guests have sometimes brought in children older than three years old for free, even though that is supposed to be the age limit for a Guest visiting free of charge.

Apparently, Disney Cast Members used to let families of Guests enter Disneyland without asking for confirmation of the children’s age if the children in question were stroller inhabitants, looked very young, or had turned three very recently.

Face Masks at Disney

Children wearing masks at Walt Disney World Resort. Annual Passes are used by Annual Passholders for Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, while Disneyland Magic Key Passes (which include the Enchant Key, Believe Key, Imagine Key, and Dream Key) are used by Disney Guests (particularly California residents) at Disneyland Resort in Southern California. Credit: Disney

But no longer! Now, you are more likely to be stopped at the Disneyland entryway and questioned further. One Disneyland Guest, Twitter user @LexisH0546, reported the following on Twitter: “My sister can’t get a Magic Key for her 3-year-old (her whole family has MKs) because it is 30 days past his third birthday, and THEY ASK TO SEE HIS BIRTH CERTIFICATE!”

That 30-day deadline is now a firm one for Disneyland and any Disneyland Magic Key Pass, apparently, so you will want to get all of your Magic Keys with plenty of time to spare — and be sure to make sure everything is in order for your child’s Magic Key, too, if they are older than three years old by even a small amount of time.

Disney Annual Pass

Although Magic Keys are associated with Disneyland Resort, Annual Passes are associated with Walt Disney World Resort. Annual Passes are used by Annual Passholders for Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, while Disneyland Magic Key Passes (which include the Enchant Key, Believe Key, Imagine Key, and Dream Key) are used by Disney Guests (particularly California residents) at Disneyland Resort in Southern California. Photo Credit: Disneylists.com

This 30-day deadline also involves Magic Key renewals (which have been highly anticipated by Magic Keyholders and Annual Passholders). You can supposedly renew your Magic Keys up to 30 days before their expiration date — and Disney is not, apparently, going to be lenient if you are even a day late!

Disney Parks and Disney Resorts might be struggling to deal with the amount of badly-behaved people visiting Disney locations these days, but it seems like Disney is at least maintaining control in some ways (whether it’s changing its dress code rules to foil the plans of TikTokers seeking freebies, or refusing to make exceptions regarding Magic Keys).

Are you a Magic Keyholder? Have you encountered any difficulties with Disneyland Magic Key Pass renewals, the Magic Key program, or children’s admission to Disneyland?

 

About Sharon

Sharon is a writer and animal lover from New England. Sharon's two main focuses in her work are Disney's correlations with pop culture and the significance of Disney princesses (which was the basis for her college thesis). When she's not writing about Disney, Sharon spends her time singing, dancing, and cavorting with woodland creatures!